National Academy of Medicine

 

Clinician well-being is essential for safe, high-quality patient care.

However, clinicians of all kinds, across all specialties and care settings, are experiencing alarming rates of burnout. Among the most telling of statistics, more than 50 percent of U.S. physicians report significant symptoms. Burnout is a syndrome characterized by a high degree of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization (i.e., cynicism), and a low sense of personal accomplishment at work.

Clinician burnout can have serious, wide-ranging consequences, from reduced job performance and high turnover rates to—in the most extreme cases—medical error and clinician suicide. On the other hand, clinician well-being supports improved patient-clinician relationships, a high-functioning care team, and an engaged and effective workforce. In other words, when we invest in clinician well-being, everyone wins.

Supporting clinician well-being requires sustained attention and action at organizational, state, and national levels, as well as investment in research and information-sharing to advance evidence-based solutions. 

Browse or click below to learn more about the Action Collaborative.

 

Over 130 Organizations Formally Commit to Promoting Clinician Well-Being

Over 130 organizations have joined the National Academy of Medicine in formally committing to promote clinician well-being and combat burnout. Please browse the statements, and if your organization is committed to supporting clinician well-being, consider making a statement and joining the Action Collaborative as a network organization. Read the statements >>

Call to Express Clinician Well-Being and Resilience Through Art

The National Academy of Medicine is calling on artists of all kinds to explore what clinician burnout, clinician well-being, and clinician resilience looks, feels, and sounds like to people on both sides of the clinician-patient relationship. 

Submit artwork that creatively expresses your experience with burnout and what wellness means to you.  Learn more >>


In 2017, the National Academy of Medicine launched the Action Collaborative on Clinician Well-Being and Resilience, a network of more than 50 organizations committed to reversing trends in clinician burnout. The Collaborative has three goals:

  1. Improve baseline understanding of challenges to clinician well-being;
  2. Raise the visibility of clinician stress and burnout; and
  3. Elevate evidence-based, multidisciplinary solutions that will improve patient care by caring for the caregiver. 

The Action Collaborative is composed of four working groups that will meet over the course of two years to identify evidence-based strategies to improve clinician well-being at both the individual and systems levels. Products and activities of these four working groups include an online knowledge hub, a series of NAM Perspectives discussion papers, an all-encompassing conceptual model that reflects the domains affecting clinician well-being, and a common set of definitions.

Download our one-pager to share >>

Action Collaborative Leadership
Victor Dzau, chair
Darrell Kirch, co-chair

Thomas Nasca, co-chair

Action Collaborative Working Groups
Please click
here to view members of our four working groups.

 



National Call for Commitment Statements – Over 130 Received! 

Over 130 organizations have formally committed to promoting clinician well-being and combating burnout. Read the statements >>

The National Academy of Medicine is still looking for additional organizations to commit, with us, to supporting clinician well-being. Consider sharing your organization’s commitment to improving clinician well-being and reducing clinician burnout by submitting a commitment statement and becoming a network organization of the Action Collaborative on Clinician Well-Being and Resilience. To submit a commitment statement, please click here.

 

Registration Now Open! February 2, 2018 Webinar

Join the Action Collaborative for a free lunchtime webinar on February 2, 2018. The webinar will release several resources and provide a first look at an online repository that will provide users with resources related to clinician burnout and well-being. Register for the webinar>>

 

Calling on People to Express Clinician Well-Being Through Art! 

The National Academy of Medicine is calling on artists of all kinds to explore what clinician burnout, clinician well-being, and clinician resilience looks, feels, and sounds like to people across the country. 

Submit artwork that creatively expresses your experience with burnout and what wellness means to you.  Learn more >>


Clinician Well-Being and Resilience Webinar: Presentation of Resources and Online Repository | February 2, 2018

On February 2, 2018, the National Academy of Medicine’s Action Collaborative on Clinician Well-Being and Resilience will host a webinar from 1:30 – 2:30pm EST to release several resources and provide a first look at an online repository aimed at providing users with resources related to clinician burnout and promising solutions to promote clinician well-being. Register >>

View all events>>


Nurse Suicide: Breaking the Silence

Although burnout, depression, and suicide in nurses are beginning to be recognized as a significant threat to our health care system, we cannot report the rate at which nurses die by suicide because this data is not accurately tracked. We also know through first-hand accounts that nurse suicide is rarely discussed and not often addressed institutionally. In our new discussion paper, the authors share their insights and the insights of those who have been personally affected by the loss of a colleague, relative, or friend in an effort to encourage formal tracking of data on nurse suicide, as well as focus attention on this critical issue. Read the discussion paper>>

 

Burnout Among Health Care Professionals: A Call to Explore and Address This Underrecognized Threat to Safe, High-Quality Care

The US health care system is rapidly changing in an effort to deliver better care, improve health, and lower costs while providing care for an aging population with high rates of chronic disease and co-morbidities. Among the changes affecting clinical practice are new payment and delivery approaches, electronic health records, patient portals, and publicly reported quality metrics—all of which change the landscape of how care is provided, documented, and reimbursed. Navigating these changes are health care professionals (HCPs), whose daily work is critical to the success of health care improvement. Unfortunately, as a result of these changes and resulting added pressures, many HCPs are burned out, a syndrome characterized by a high degree of emotional exhaustion and high depersonalization (i.e., cynicism), and a low sense of personal accomplishment from work. Read the discussion paper >>

 

Additional NAM Publications Related to Clinician Well-Being

The National Academy of Medicine has published numerous discussion paper and commentaries related to clinician well-being and clinician burnout. To view all of the publications, please click here.

 

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We currently do not require additional formal sponsors of the collaborative, but we very much want all interested organizations to stay connected as supportive partners. You can join our efforts by becoming a Network Organization of the Action Collaborative. 

Learn more about becoming a Network Organization

Thank you for your commitment to clinician well-being. 


ABFM Foundation

Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education | Commitment Statement

Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education | Commitment Statement

Alliance of Independent Academic Medical Centers | Commitment Statement

American Academy of Family Physicians | Commitment Statement

American Academy of Neurology | Commitment Statement

American Academy of Pediatrics 

American Association of Colleges of Nursing | Commitment Statement

American Association of Osteopathic Medicine | Commitment Statement

American Association of Critical-Care Nurses | Commitment Statement

American Board of Internal Medicine and the ABIM Foundation | Commitment Statement

American Board of Medical Specialties | Commitment Statement

American College of Emergency Physicians | Commitment Statement

American College of Physicians | Commitment Statement

American College of Surgeons

American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists | Commitment Statement

American Dental Education Association | Commitment Statement

American Hospital Association

American Medical Association | Commitment Statement

 

American Nurses Association | Commitment Statement

American Osteopathic Association | Commitment Statement

American Psychiatric Association | Commitment Statement

American Society of Anesthesiologists | Commitment Statement

American Society of Health-System Pharmacists | Commitment Statement

Association of American Medical Colleges (with support from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) | Commitment Statement

Council of Medical Specialty Societies | Commitment Statement

 

Federation of State Medical Boards | Commitment Statement

IBM Watson Health | Commitment Statement

Johns Hopkins Medicine | Commitment Statement

Massachusetts General Hospital

Society for Academic Emergency Medicine and Association of Academic Chairs of Emergency Medicine | Commitment Statement

Society of Neurological Surgeons | Commitment Statement

UAB Medicine

UnitedHealth Group



clinician-well-being-sign-up-3

 


If you are suicidal and need emergency help, call 911 immediately or 1-800-273-8255 if in the United States. If you are in another country, find a 24/7 hotline at www.iasp.info/resources/Crises_Centres.