National Academy of Medicine
  • About the National Academy of Medicine

    Get updates from the NAM
    The National Academy of Medicine (NAM), established in 1970 under the name Institute of Medicine (IOM), is an independent organization of eminent professionals from diverse fields including health and medicine; the natural, social, and behavioral sciences; and beyond. It serves alongside the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering as adviser to the nation and the international community. Through its domestic and global initiatives, the NAM works to address critical issues in health, medicine, and related policy and inspire positive action across sectors. The NAM collaborates closely with its peer academies and other divisions  within the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

    Programs

    In addition to its honorific functions, the NAM administers fellowships, scholarships, and awards; hosts workshops, expert meetings, and symposia; and conducts programs to enrich the broader work of the academies. The NAM also publishes Perspectives, an expert commentary and discussion paper series.

    View Programs

    Initiatives

    The NAM’s initiatives respond to current and emerging needs in health, medicine, and related policy.

    View Initiatives

    NAM Organizational Chart | 2015 Annual Report

  • Membership in the National Academy of Medicine

    The NAM has more than 2,000 members elected in recognition of professional achievement and commitment to volunteer service in activities of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (“the Academies”). The NAM elects no more than 70 regular members and 10 international members annually. For those at the top of their field, NAM membership reflects the height of professional achievement and commitment to service.

    • Election Criteria and Process

      Membership in the National Academy of Medicine is based upon:

      • distinguished professional achievement in a field related to medicine and health;
      • demonstrated and continued involvement with the issues of health care, prevention of disease, education, or research;
      • skills and resources likely to contribute to achieving the Academy’s mission; and
      • willingness to be an active participant in the work of the Academy.

      The NAM Articles of Organization stipulate that at least one-quarter of the membership shall be selected from fields outside the health professions that interface with health and medicine, such as the natural, social, computational and behavioral sciences, as well as law, administration, and engineering.

      The election of individuals to the National Academy of Medicine begins with a confidential nomination by two NAM members who are well acquainted with the candidate’s work. In sponsoring the nomination, the NAM member affirms his or her personal assessment that the candidate meets the NAM’s primary criterion of excellence and outstanding professional achievement in a field relevant to the mission of the NAM. Each year, up to 70 regular members and 10 international members are elected to the NAM by the regular membership body at large. The annual nomination cycle begins on November 1 and closes on February 1. The election takes place in late summer with new members announced in conjunction with the NAM Annual Meeting in October.

    • Class of 2015

      Meet the Class of 2015

      The National Academy of Medicine announced the names of 80 new members, including 10 international members, during its 45th Annual Meeting in Washington, DC, on October 19, 2015. Election to the National Academy of Medicine is considered one of the highest honors in the fields of health and medicine and recognizes individuals who have demonstrated outstanding professional achievement and commitment to service.

      “Our newly elected members represent the brightest, most influential, and passionate people in health, science and medicine in our nation and internationally,” said NAM President Victor Dzau. “They are at the top of their fields and are committed to service. The expertise they bring to the organization will help us respond to today’s most pressing health-related challenges and inform the future of health, science, and medicine. It is my privilege to welcome these distinguished individuals to the National Academy of Medicine.”

      Read more >>

      Election to membership in the National Academy of Medicine is based upon:

      • distinguished professional achievement in a field related to medicine and health;
      • demonstrated and continued involvement with the issues of health care, prevention of disease, education, or research;
      • skills and resources likely to contribute to achieving the Academy’s mission; and
      • willingness to be an active participant in the work of the Academy.

      The NAM Articles of Organization stipulate that at least one-quarter of the membership be selected from fields outside the health professions that interface with health and medicine, such as the natural, social, computational and behavioral sciences, as well as law, administration, and engineering.

       

      Members log in for additional information>>

      Evan D. Abel, M.B.B.S. (M.D.), D.Phil
      John B. Stokes Chair in Diabetes Research
      Director, Fraternal Order of Eagles Diabetes Research Center
      University of Iowa, Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine

      Sudhir Anand, D.Phil. (International Member)
      Professor of Economics
      University of Oxford
      Adjunct Professor of Global Health
      Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

      Christopher P. Austin, M.D.
      Director
      National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences
      National Institutes of Health

      Howard Bauchner, M.D.
      Editor-in-Chief
      Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA)
      American Medical Association
      Professor of Pediatrics and Public Health
      Boston University School of Medicine

      Kirsten Bibbins-Domingo, Ph.D., M.D., M.A.S.
      Lee Goldman, M.D., Endowed Chair in Medicine
      Professor of Medicine and Epidemiology and Biostatistics
      University of California, San Francisco

      Andrew B. Bindman, M.D.

      Professor
      Medicine and Epidemiology & Biostatistics
      University of California, San Francisco

      Diane F. Birt, Ph.D.
      Distinguished Professor Emeritus
      Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition
      College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and College of Human Sciences
      Iowa State University

      Rena Bizios, Ph.D.
      Peter T. Flawn Professor
      Department of Biomedical Engineering
      The University of Texas at San Antonio

      Otis W. Brawley, M.D., M.A.C.P.
      Chief Medical Officer
      American Cancer Society
      Professor of Hematology, Medical Oncology, Medicine and Epidemiology
      Emory University

      Serdar E. Bulun, M.D.
      JJ Sciarra Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology
      Chair, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology
      Prentice Women’s Hospital
      Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

      Linda Burnes Bolton, Dr.P.H., R.N., FAAN
      Vice President and Chief Nursing Officer
      Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

      Atul Butte, M.D., Ph.D.
      Director
      Institute for Computational Health Sciences
      University of California, San Francisco

      Joseph D. Buxbaum, Ph.D.
      Professor and Vice-Chair for Research
      Department of Psychiatry
      Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

      Mario R. Capecchi, Ph.D.
      Distinguised Professor
      Department of Human Genetics and Biology
      University of Utah School of Medicine

      Jean-Laurent Casanova, M.D., Ph.D. (International Member)
      Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute
      Professor and Senior Attending Physician
      St. Giles Laboratory of Human Genetics of Infectious Diseases
      The Rockefeller University

      Glenn M. Chertow, M.D., M.P.H.
      Norman S. Coplon/Satellite Healthcare Professor of Medicine
      Department of Medicine
      Chief, Division of Nephrology
      Stanford University School of Medicine

      Kathleen R. Cho, M.D.
      Peter A. Ward Professor of Pathology
      Department of Pathology
      Vice-Chair for Academic Affairs
      University of Michigan Medical School

      Benjamin K. Chu, M.D., M.P.H.
      Executive Vice President
      Group President
      Southern California and Georgia
      Kaiser Permanente

      Sarah Cleaveland, B.Sc., B.A., VetMB, Ph.D.
      Professor of Comparative Epidemiology
      Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine
      University of Glasgow

      Josep Dalmau, M.D., Ph.D. (International Member)
      ICREA Research Professor
      Institut d’ Investigacions Biomediques
      August Pi Sunyer (IDIBAPS)
      Universitat de Barcelona

      Sally C. Davies, FRS, FMedSci (International Member)
      Chief Medical Officer (England) and Chief Medical Advisor to UK Government
      Department of Health
      Government of Great Britain

      Tejal A. Desai, Ph.D.
      Professor and Chair
      Department of Bioengineering and Therapeutic Sciences
      School of Pharmacy and School of Medicine
      University of California, San Francisco

      Richard DiMarchi, Ph.D.
      Distinguished Professor of Chemical-Biology
      Department of Chemistry
      Indiana University

      Dennis E. Discher, Ph.D.
      Robert D. Bent Professor
      Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Mechanical Engineering
      & Applied Mechanics Bioengineering
      University of Pennsylvania

      Kenneth A. Dodge, Ph.D.
      William McDougall Professor
      Sanford School of Public Policy
      Duke University

      Ronald S. Duman, Ph.D.
      Elizabeth Mears and House Jamison Professor
      Department of Psychiatry and Neurobiology
      Director, Abraham Ribicoff Research Facilities
      Connecticut Mental Health Center
      Yale University School of Medicine

      James Eisenach, M.D.
      Frank M James III Professor of Anesthesiology and Physiology
      & Pharmacology
      Wake Forest University School of Medicine

      Napoleone Ferrara, M.D.
      Distinguished Professor of Pathology and Ophthalomology
      University of California, San Diego

      Julie A. Freischlag, M.D.
      Dean, School of Medicine
      Vice Chancellor, Human Health Sciences
      University of California, Davis

      Amato J. Giaccia, Ph.D.
      Jack, Lulu and Sam Willson Professor of Cancer Biology
      Department of Radiation Oncology
      Stanford University School of Medicine

      Melissa L. Gilliam, M.D., M.P.H.
      Dean for Diversity and Inclusion and Professor
      Department of Obstetrics & Gyencology and Pediatrics
      The University of Chicago

      1. Gary Gilliland, Ph.D., M.D.
        President and Director
        Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

      Christopher K. Glass, M.D., Ph.D.
      Professor of Cellular and Molecular Medicine
      Professor of Medicine
      Ben and Wanda Hildyard Chair in Hereditary Diseases
      University of California, San Diego

      Fastone M. Goma, B.Sc., M.B.Ch.B., M.Sc., Ph.D. (International Member)

      Dean
      University of Zambia School of Medicine

      Michael R. Green, M.D., Ph.D.
      Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute
      Professor and Chair
      Department of Molecular, Cell and Cancer Biology
      Director, Cancer Center
      University of Massachusetts Medical School

      Murat Günel, M.D.
      Nixdorff-German Professor and Chairman
      Department of Neurosurgery
      Professor of Neurobiology and Genetics
      Chief, Department of Neurosurgery
      Yale-New Haven Hospital
      Yale School of Medicine

      Robert A. Harrington, M.D.
      Arthur L. Bloomfield Professor of Medicine & Chair
      Department of Medicine
      Stanford University

      Sean Hennessy, Pharm.D., Ph.D.
      Professor of Epidemiology and of Systems
      Pharmacology and Translational Therapeutics
      University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

      Friedhelm Hildebrandt, M.D.
      Warren E. Grupe Professor of Pediatrics
      Boston Children’s Hospital
      Chief, Division of Nephrology
      Harvard Medical School

      Frank Hu, M.D., Ph.D.
      Professor
      Departments of Nutrition and Epidemiology
      Harvard School of Public Health

      Anna Huttenlocher, M.D.
      Vilas Distinguished Achievement Professor
      Departments of Pediatrics and Medical Microbiology and Immunology
      University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health

      Frances E. Jensen, M.D., F.A.C.P.

      Professor and Chair
      Department of Neurology
      Co-Director
      Penn Medicine Translational Neuroscience Center
      University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

      Ned H. Kalin, M.D.
      Hedberg Professor and Chairman
      Departments of Psychiatry and Psychology
      Director, HealthEmotions Research Institute
      Wisconsin Psychiatric Institute and Clinics
      University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health

      Beth Y. Karlan, M.D.
      Director, Women’s Cancer Program and
      Division of Gynecologic Oncology
      Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute
      and Department of OB/GYN
      Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology
      Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

      Arthur Kaufman, M.D.
      Vice Chancellor for Community Health
      Distinguished Professor of Family and Community Medicine
      The University of New Mexico

      Kenneth W. Kinzler, Ph.D.
      Professor of Oncology
      Director, Ludwig Center at Johns Hopkins University
      Associate Director of Basic Research
      The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins

      Keith P. Klugman, M.D., Ph.D.
      Director, Pneumonia
      Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation
      Emeritus William H. Foege Professor of Global Health
      Emory University
      Honorary Professor
      University of the Witwatersrand Respiratory and Meningeal Pathogens Research Unit

      Walter J. Koroshetz, M.D.
      Director
      National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

      Vivian S. Lee, M.D., Ph.D., M.B.A.
      A. Lorris Betz Senior Vice President for Health Sciences
      Department of Radiology
      University of Utah

      Kung-Yee Liang, Ph.D.
      President and Professor
      National Yang-Ming University

      Roberto Malinow, M.D., Ph.D.
      Professor of Neurosciences and Neurobiology
      Department of Neuroscience and Section for Neurobiology
      in the Division of Biology
      University of California, San Diego

      Laurie K. McCauley, D.D.S., Ph.D.
      William K. and Mary Ann Najjar
      Professor and Dean
      School of Dentistry
      University of Michigan

      David A. McCormick, Ph.D.
      Dorys McConnell Duberg Professor of Neurobiology
      Yale School of Medicine

      David O. Meltzer, M.D., Ph.D.
      Chief, Section of Hospital Medicine and Professor
      Department of Medicine, Department of Economics,
      and Harris School of Public Policy
      The University of Chicago

      Joan W. Miller, M.D., FARVO
      Henry Willard Williams Professor of Ophthalmology
      Chair, Department of Ophthalmology
      Chief of Ophthalmology, Massachusetts Eye and Ear
      Massachusetts General Hospital
      Harvard Medical School

      Vincent Mor, Ph.D.
      Florence Pirce Grant University Professor
      Department of Health Services, Policy and Practice
      School of Public Health
      Brown University

      James A. Morone, Ph.D.
      John Hazen White Professor of Political Science and Public Policy
      Department of Political Science
      Brown University

      Edvard I. Moser, Ph.D. (International Member)
      Director
      Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience
      Norwegian University of Science and Technology

      May-Britt Moser, Ph.D. (International Member)
      Co-Director
      Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience
      Director
      Centre for Neural Computation
      Norwegian University of Science and Technology

      Vasant Narasimhan, M.D., M.P.P.

      Global Head of Development
      Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation

      Robert W. Neumar, M.D., Ph.D.
      Professor and Chair
      Department of Emergency Medicine
      University of Michigan Medical School

      Laura E. Niklason, M.D., Ph.D.
      Professor & Vice-Chair
      Anesthesia & Biomedical Engineering
      Yale University

      Elizabeth O. Ofili, M.D., M.P.H., F.A.C.C.
      Senior Associate Dean
      Clinical and Translational Research
      Professor of Medicine and Director
      Clinical Research Center
      Morehouse School of Medicine

      Nikola P. Pavletich, Ph.D.
      Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute
      Stephen and Barbara Friedman Chairman, Structural Biology Program
      Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center

      Jonathan B. Perlin, M.D., Ph.D., M.S.H.A., M.A.C.P
      President, Clinical Services and Chief Medical Officer
      HCA, Inc.
      Clinical Professor of Medicine & Biomedical Informatics
      Vanderbilt University

      Kenneth S. Ramos, M.D., Ph.D., Pharm.B.
      Associate Vice President for Precision Health Sciences
      Professor of Medicine
      Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care  and Sleep Medicine
      Arizona Health Sciences Center

      Bonnie W. Ramsey, M.D.
      Director
      Center for Clinical and Translational Research
      Seattle Children’s Research Institute
      Endowed Professor and Vice Chair for Research
      Department of Pediatrics
      University of Washington School of Medicine

      Valerie F. Reyna, Ph.D.
      Director, Human Neuroscience Institute
      Center for Behavioral Economics and Decision Research
      Co-Director, Cornell Magnetic Resonance Imaging Facility
      Professor of Human Development
      Cornell University

      Alexander Rudensky, Ph.D.
      Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute
      Chairman, Immunology Program
      Director, Ludwig Center for Cancer Immunotherapy
      Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center

      Richard H. Scheller, Ph.D.
      Chief Scientific Officer
      23andMe

      Susan E. Skochelak, M.D., M.P.H.
      Group Vice President, Medical Education
      Professor Emeritus, Family Medicine
      American Medical Association

      Nahum Sonenberg, Ph.D. (International Member)
      James McGill Professor
      Department of Biochemistry
      Goodman Cancer Research Centre
      McGill University

      Douglas O. Staiger, Ph.D.
      John French Professor in Economics
      Dartmouth College

      Kevin Struhl, Ph.D.
      David Wesley Gaiser Professor of Biological
      Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology
      Harvard Medical School

      Chorh-Chuan Tan, M.B.B.S., Ph.D. (International Member)
      President and Professor of Medicine
      National University of Singapore

      Marita G. Titler, Ph.D., RN, FAAN
      Professor and Rhetaugh G. Dumas Endowed Chair
      Department Chair, Systems Populations, and Leadership
      University of Michigan School of Nursing

      Richard L. Wahl, M.D.

      Elizabeth E. Mallinckrodt Professor and Chair of Radiology
      Director, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology
      Washington University School of Medicine

      Alan R. Weil, J.D., M.P.P.
      Editor-In-Chief
      Health Affairs
      Vice President for Public Policy
      Project HOPE

      John Whyte, M.D., Ph.D.
      Director
      Moss Rehabilitation Research Institute
      Professor
      Rehabilitation Medicine
      Thomas Jefferson University

      Shinya Yamanaka, M.D., Ph.D. (International Member)
      Senior Investigator, Gladstone Institute of Cardiovascular Disease
      Center for iPS Cell Research and Application
      L.K. Whittier Foundation Investigator
      Kyoto University

    For more information about membership, contact Donna Duncan at dduncan@nas.edu

     

  • NAM Leadership

     

    Victor J. Dzau, M.D., President

    Dzau head shotVictor J. Dzau is the President of the National Academy of Medicine (NAM), formerly the Institute of Medicine (IOM). In addition, he serves as Chair of the Health and Medicine Division Committee of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. He is Chancellor Emeritus and James B. Duke Professor of Medicine at Duke University and the past President and CEO of the Duke University Health System. Previously, Dr. Dzau was the Hersey Professor of Theory and Practice of Medicine and Chairman of Medicine at Harvard Medical School’s Brigham and Women’s Hospital, as well as Chairman of the Department of Medicine at Stanford University.

    • Read more

      Dr. Dzau has made a significant impact on medicine through his seminal research in cardiovascular medicine and genetics, his pioneering of the discipline of vascular medicine, and his leadership in health care innovation. His important work on the renin angiotensin system (RAS) paved the way for the contemporary understanding of RAS in cardiovascular disease and the development of RAS inhibitors as widely used, lifesaving drugs. Dr. Dzau also pioneered gene therapy for vascular disease, and his recent work on stem cell paracrine mechanisms and the use of microRNA in direct reprogramming provides novel insight into stem cell biology and regenerative medicine.

      In his role as a leader in health care, Dr. Dzau has led efforts in health care innovation. His vision is for academic health sciences centers to lead the transformation of medicine through innovation, translation, and globalization. Leading this vision at Duke, he and his colleagues developed the Duke Translational Medicine Institute, the Duke Global Health Institute, the Duke-National University of Singapore Graduate Medical School, and the Duke Institute for Health Innovation. These initiatives create a seamless continuum from discovery and translational sciences to clinical care, and they promote transformative innovation in health.

      As one of the world’s preeminent academic health leaders, Dr. Dzau advises governments, corporations, and universities worldwide. He has  been a member of the Council of the IOM and the Advisory Committee to the Director of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), as well as Chair of the NIH Cardiovascular Disease Advisory Committee and the Association of Academic Health Centers. He served on the Governing Board of the Duke-National University of Singapore Graduate Medical School and the Board of Health Governors of the World Economic Forum and chaired its Global Agenda Council on Personalized and Precision Medicine. He also served as the Senior Health Policy Advisor to Her Highness Sheikha Moza (Chair of the Qatar Foundation). Currently, he is a member of the Board of Directors of the Singapore Health System, the Expert Board of the Imperial College Health Partners, UK, and the International Advisory Board of the Biomedical Science Council of Singapore. In 2011, he led a partnership between Duke University, the World Economic Forum, and McKinsey, and he founded the International Partnership for Innovative Healthcare Delivery and currently chairs its Board of Directors.

      Among his honors and recognitions are the Gustav Nylin Medal from the Swedish Royal College of Medicine; the Max Delbruck Medal from Humboldt University, Charité, and the Max Planck Institute; the Commemorative Gold Medal from the Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich; the Inaugural Hatter Award from the Medical Research Council of South Africa; the Polzer Prize from the European Academy of Sciences and Arts; the Novartis Award for Hypertension Research; the Distinguished Scientist Award from the American Heart Association (AHA); and the AHA Research Achievement Award for his contributions to cardiovascular biology and medicine. Recently, he was awarded the Public Service Medal by the President of Singapore. He has received nine honorary doctorates.

    J. Michael McGinnis, M.D., The Leonard D. Schaeffer Executive Officer

    Michael McGinnis, MD, MA, MPP: An active front-line participant in national and international health policy and programs for more than four decades, Michael McGinnis is currently Leonard D. Schaeffer Executive Officer at the National Academy of Medicine (NAM). He is also an elected Member of the NAM, Executive Director of the NAM Leadership Consortium on Value & Science-Driven Health Care, and founder and facilitator of its Learning Health System initiative. In a tenure unusual for political and policy posts, he held continuous appointment through the Carter, Reagan, Bush and Clinton Administrations at the Department of Health and Human Services, with policy responsibilities for disease prevention and health promotion. In this capacity, he was founder and steward of various still ongoing programs and policies, including: the Healthy People program of national goals and objectives, the HHS/USDA Dietary Guidelines for Americans, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, and the Ten Essential Services of Public Health. 

    • Read more

      In other appointments, he served as founding director/chair of: the health program group at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation; the World Bank/European Commission Task Force for Health Reconstruction in Bosnia; the federal Office of Research Integrity, and the HHS Nutrition Policy Board. Early in his career, he served as director of the World Health Organization’s smallpox eradication program in Uttar Pradesh, India, and director of the U.S.-Eastern Europe cooperative health research program. Educated at Berkeley (AB), UCLA (MA, MD), and Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government (MPP), he is perhaps most recognized for his research and publications on population health and the root sources of morbidity and mortality. Recognitions include the federal Distinguished Service Medal, the 1996 National Health Leader of the Year award, and the 2013 national Public Health Hero award.

    2016-2017 NAM Council

    The NAM is governed by a Council composed of NAM members elected by the membership.

    Victor J. Dzau, M.D., Chairman

    Margaret Hamburg, M.D., Foreign Secretary

    Jane E. Henney, M.D., Home Secretary

    Nancy E. Adler, Ph.D.
    Professor of Medical Psychology
    Director, Center for Health and Community
    University of California, San Francisco

    Nancy Andrews, Ph.D., M.D.
    Vice Chancellor and Dean
    Duke University School of Medicine

    Sheila P. Burke, M.P.A., R.N.
    Faculty Research Fellow
    Malcolm Weiner Center for Social Policy
    John F. Kennedy School of Government
    Harvard University

    R. Alta Charo, J.D.
    Warren P. Knowles Professor of Law & Bioethics
    School of Law
    Department of Medical History and Bioethics
    School of Medicine and Public Health
    University of Wisconsin-Madison

    Angela Diaz, M.D., M.P.H.
    Jean C. and James W. Crystal Professor of Adolescent Health
    Department of Pediatrics and Department of Preventive Medicine
    Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

    Jack E. Dixon, Ph.D.
    Associate Vice Chancellor, Scientific Affairs
    Distinguished Professor
    Department of Pharmacology
    University of California, San Diego

    Mark C. Fishman, M.D.
    President
    Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research

    Elaine Fuchs, Ph.D.
    Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute
    Laboratory Head of Mammalian Cell Biology and Development
    The Rockefeller University

    Lynn R. Goldman, M.D., M.P.H.
    Dean, School of Public Health and Health Services
    Professor, Environmental and Occupational Health
    The George Washington University

    Diane E. Griffin, M.D., Ph.D.
    Distinguished University Service Professor
    Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

    H. Robert Horvitz, Ph.D.
    Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute
    Professor of Biology
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    Steven E. Hyman, M.D.
    Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor
    Director, Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research
    Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard

    Raynard Kington, M.D., Ph.D.
    President
    Grinnell College

    Gilbert Omenn, M.D., Ph.D.
    Professor of Computational Medicine and Bioinformatics, Internal Medicine, Human Genetics, and Public Health
    University of Michigan

    J. Sanford (Sandy) Schwartz, M.D.
    Leon Hess Professor of Medicine, Health Management and Economics
    Perelman School of Medicine and Wharton School of Business
    University of Pennsylvania

    William W. Stead, M.D.
    Associate Vice Chancellor for Health Affairs
    Chief Strategy Officer
    Vanderbilt University Medical Center
    McKesson Foundation Professor of Biomedical Informatics & Medicine
    Vanderbilt University Medical

    Tadataka Yamada, M.D.
    Managing Partner
    Mountain Field LLC

    Keith R. Yamamoto, Ph.D.
    Executive Vice Dean, School of Medicine
    Professor, Department of Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology
    University of California, San Francisco

     

  • Awards and Honors at the National Academy of Medicine

    The NAM presents awards annually to recognize singular individuals in the fields of health, medicine, and science.

    sarnatThe Rhoda and Bernard Sarnat International Prize in Mental Health

    The Rhoda and Bernard Sarnat International Prize in Mental Health recognizes individuals, groups, or organizations for outstanding achievement in improving mental health.

    lienhardGustav O. Lienhard Award

    The Gustav O. Lienhard Award recognizes outstanding achievement in improving health care services in the United States.

    Member and Staff Awards

    The NAM presents awards annually to members and staff whose service to the mission of the NAM and the Academies has been especially distinguished.

    mcdermottThe Walsh McDermott Medal

    The Walsh McDermott Medal recognizes an NAM member for distinguished service to the NAM and the Academies over an extended period of time.

    yarmolinsky

    The Adam Yarmolinsky Medal

    The Adam Yarmolinsky Medal is awarded to an NAM member from a discipline outside the health and medical sciences.

    rall

    The David Rall Medal

    The David Rall Medal is awarded to an NAM member  who has demonstrated particularly distinguished leadership as a chair of a study committee or other activity.

    cecil

    Cecil Award

    The Cecil Award recognizes a current or former staff member for outstanding, sustained contributions to programs or membership activities.

  • Support the NAMmake a gift no drp


    Invest in the future of health

    day of giving

    Many thanks to those of you who joined us on December 1, 2015 for the NAM’s third annual day of impactful giving.  39 donors made gifts totaling nearly $20,000. Gifts from new donors, lapsed donors, and increases in giving by current donors will be matched by the generosity of an anonymous donor. This brings the total raised to $25,700. With your contribution, important findings can be translated into scientifically sound guidance that will reach the public and change lives. We greatly appreciate all that you do in service and support of NAM all year long, and for making this special day of giving so meaningful.

    Announcing the 2015 Matching Gift Challenge!

    Earlier this year, an NAM member established a $150,000 matching gift challenge. This challenge will match, dollar-for-dollar, gifts to the NAM. Increases over a donor’s 2014 giving will be matched, as well as gifts from first-time donors or those who didn’t make a gift in 2014. The generous support of members and friends, matched through this challenge, will significantly enhance our ability to set the agenda for progress in health and health care. Click here to read more about this giving opportunity.

    The National Academy of Medicine is the premier organization of health and medical professionals in the world. Our members are architects of major scientific breakthroughs, policy leaders in the United States and abroad, exceptional care practitioners, and the brightest minds in academia. Our mission is to improve human health worldwide.

    The NAM’s groundbreaking programs and initiatives are founded on the principles of leadership, innovation, and impact. Through the unparalleled expertise of our membership, our commitment to bold and cross-cutting solutions, and our power to unite stakeholders around urgent priorities, the NAM sets the agenda for global progress in health and health care.

    As an independent, nonprofit organization, the NAM relies on philanthropic dollars to fund its work. For example, donations to the NAM support:

    • Programs to enrich the experience of early- and mid-career professionals and nurture the next generation of health and medical leaders. Learn more >>
    • A boundary-breaking effort to advise policy makers in the United States and abroad about the path forward for health reform. Learn more >>
    • An international initiative to prepare health systems to respond more efficiently to the next global crisis. Learn more >>
    • A pioneering project to unite world leaders around shared priorities and audacious goals. Learn more >>

    Gifts from generous individuals, foundations, corporations, federal agencies, and other organizations are essential to the success of these and other NAM programs. We need your support today to realize our vision for a healthier future.

    Donor Spotlight

    Read about Claire Brindis's commitment to the NAM

    Read about Claire Brindis’s commitment to the NAM >>

    Ways to Give

    Secure online gifts are the fastest way to make a difference in supporting the NAM’s mission. Learn more about the many ways to give.

    Giving Opportunities

    Gifts to the NAM may be unrestricted or designated to support specific goals within the organization. Learn more about giving opportunities.

    Donor Societies

    Learn about the benefits of membership in one of the NAM’s donor societies.


    For more information, or to make a gift, contact Julie Ische, Director of Development, at jische@nas.edu or 202-334-3031.

  • Get updates from the NAM

    Media Inquiries

    Contact Jennifer Walsh, Senior Media Officer, at jwalsh@nas.edu or 202-334-2813.

    Permissions

    To request permission to reproduce an NAM Perspective or a report of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (the Academies), contact Barb Murphy at bmurphy@nas.edu. For permission to reproduce other NAM materials, contact Laura DeStefano at ldestefano@nas.edu. To purchase or download a free copy of an Academies report, visit www.nap.edu.

    Membership

    For more information about membership in the National Academy of Medicine, see the membership overview.

    Awards and Fellowships

    For more information about the Sarnat and Lienhard awards, contact Corrin Merritt at kmerritt@nas.edu. For more information about the Health Policy Educational Program and Fellowships, contact Julia Byrnes at jbyrnes@nas.edu.

    Employment Opportunities

    Visit the Academies career center.

    Other Inquiries

    For all other inquiries, e-mail NAMedicine@nas.edu.

    Locations

    The Keck Center
    500 Fifth Street, NW
    Washington, DC
    Phone: 202-334-2000

    • Directions

      Map

      By Car from Ronald Reagan National Airport

      1. Exit the airport to George Washington Memorial Parkway NORTH.
      2. Exit to Memorial Bridge.
      3. Bear LEFT after crossing Memorial Bridge into Washington, DC.
      4. Take second LEFT onto Henry Bacon Drive, NW. You must turn LEFT at this point as your route will be blocked by Jersey walls.
      5. Turn RIGHT at the traffic light onto Constitution Avenue, NW.
      6. Turn LEFT onto Sixth Street, NW.
      7. Cross E Steet, NW. and look to your right for the parking entrance immediately before the fire station.

      By Car from Dulles International Airport

      1. Exit the airport to Airport Access Road EAST.
      2. Follow until Access Road merges with Interstate 66 EAST.
      3. Follow I-66 EAST across the Roosevelt Bridge into Washington, DC. After the bridge, I-66 becomes Route 50 EAST/Constitution Avenue, NW.
      4. Turn LEFT onto Sixth St, NW.
      5. Cross E Street, NW. and look to your right for the parking entrance immediately before the fire station.

      By Car from Baltimore/Washington International Airport

      1. Exit the airport to Interstate 195 WEST.
      2. Exit I-195 to MD-295 SOUTH (Baltimore-Washington Parkway) towards Washington, DC.
      3. Follow MD-295 SOUTH to exit for Route 50 WEST to downtown Washington, DC.
      4. Follow Route 50 WEST as it turns into New York Avenue, NE.
      5. Turn LEFT onto Sixth Street, NW.
      6. Cross F Street, NW, and look to your left for the parking entrance immediately after the fire station.

      By Metro’s Red Line

      1. Take Metro’s Red Line to the Judiciary Square station.
      2. Exit the station by following signs to the Building Museum (F Street) exit, between Fourth and Fifth Streets, NW.
      3. Turn LEFT and walk WEST on F Street, NW.
      4. Cross Fith Street, NW, and turn LEFT.
      5. Walk past the fire station parking lot. The next building on your right will be 500 Fifth Street, NW.

      By Metro’s Green or Yellow Line

      1. Take Metro’s Green or Yellow Line to the Gallery Place-Chinatown station.
      2. Exit the station by following signs to Seventh and F Streets/Arena.
      3. Turn LEFT and walk EAST on F Street NW, two blocks past the MCI Center.
      4. Turn RIGHT on to Fifth Street, NW.
      5. Walk past the fire station parking lot. The next building on your right will be 500 Fifth St, NW.

    The National Academy of Sciences Building
    2101 Constitution Ave, NW
    Washington, DC
    Phone: 202-334-2000

    • Directions

      Map

      By Car from Ronald Reagan National Airport

      1. Exit the airport to George Washington Memorial Parkway NORTH. Exit to Memorial Bridge.
      2. Bear LEFT after crossing Memorial Bridge into Washington, DC.
      3. Take second LEFT onto Henry Bacon Drive NW You must turn LEFT at this point as your route will be blocked by Jersey walls.
      4. Turn RIGHT at the traffic light onto Constitution Avenue, NW.
      5. Turn LEFT at second light onto 21st Street, NW.
      6. Parking lot entrance is on left before traffic light at intersection with C Street NW.

      By Car from Dulles International Airport

      1. Exit the airport to Airport Access Road EAST.
      2. Follow until Access Road merges with Interstate 66 EAST.
      3. Follow I-66 EAST across the Roosevelt Bridge into Washington, DC. After the bridge, I-66 becomes Route 50 EAST/Constitution Avenue, NW.
      4. Turn LEFT at fourth light onto 21st Street, NW.
      5. Parking lot entrance is on left before traffic light at intersection with C Street, NW.

      By Car from Baltimore/Washington International Airport

      1. Exit the airport to Interstate 195 WEST.
      2. Exit I-195 to MD-295 SOUTH (Baltimore-Washington Parkway) towards Washington, DC.
      3. Follow MD-295 SOUTH to exit for Route 50 WEST to downtown Washington, DC.
      4. Follow Route 50 WEST as it turns into New York Avenue, NE.
      5. Turn LEFT onto Ninth Street, NW.
      6. Turn RIGHT onto Constitution Avenue, NW.
      7. Turn RIGHT onto 21st Street, NW.
      8. Parking lot entrance is on left before traffic light at intersection with C Street, NW.

      By Metro’s Orange or Blue Line

      1. Take Metro’s Orange or Blue Line to the Foggy Bottom-GWU station.
      2. Turn RIGHT on to 23rd Street, NW, when you exit the station.
      3. Walk SOUTH on 23rd Street, NW, for approximately 7 blocks.
      4. Turn LEFT on to C Street, NW, (after the State Department).
      5. Cross 22nd Street, NW, and enter the NAS building through its rear entrance at 2100 C Street, NW.

    The Arnold and Mabel Beckman Center
    100 Academy Drive
    Irvine, CA
    Phone: 949-721-2200

    • Directions

      Map

      From the Los Angeles Area

      1. Follow Interstate 405 South to Highway 73 South/SJH Toll Road.
      2. Take Highway 73 approximately 2 miles and EXIT at University Drive.
      3. Turn LEFT on University Drive and continue to California Avenue.
      4. Turn RIGHT on California Avenue, then RIGHT at the first street, Academy. The center’s address is 100 Academy Drive.

      From the San Diego Area

      1. Follow Interstate 5 North to Interstate 405 North.
      2. Take the Jeffrey/University Drive off-ramp and turn LEFT.
      3. Continue on University Drive approximately 3 miles to California Avenue.
      4. Turn LEFT on California Avenue, then RIGHT at the first street, Academy. The center’s address is 100 Academy Drive.

      From the Riverside Area

      1. Take the 91 Freeway West to the 55 Freeway South to Interstate 405 South.
      2. EXIT at Jamboree Road West, toward the coast.
      3. Continue on Jamboree Road to Campus Drive.
      4. Turn LEFT at Campus Drive.
      5. Turn RIGHT on University Drive.
      6. At the second signal, California Avenue, turn LEFT.
      7. Turn RIGHT at the first street, Academy. The center’s address is 100 Academy Drive.

    The J. Erik Jonsson Conference Center
    314 Quissett Avenue
    Woods Hole, MA
    Phone: 508-548-3760

    • Directions

       Map

      Barnstable Municipal Airport in Hyannis, MA, is the local public airport serving the Falmouth/Woods Hole area, a distance of approximately 25 miles. Several airlines operate regularly scheduled air shuttle services from Boston and New York to Hyannis. Major airports serving the New England/Cape Cod area are:

      Logan Airport in Boston, MA
      T.F. Green Airport in Providence, Rl
      LaGuardia Airport in New York, NY

      The Center operates a shuttle service (mini-van) which can assist in transporting meeting participants from their hotels to the Center. Arrangements should be made in advance with the receptionist at the Center or by calling the Center at least one half-hour prior to desired time of pickup. Groups transporting large numbers of participants may need to hire the services of a local bus company. Bus transportation to the Falmouth/Woods Hole area is provided by Bonanza Bus Lines, Inc. Car rental agencies operate at each airport location. Driving time from Boston or Providence is approximately 1.5 hours and from New York City is approximately 5 hours.

      From New York City

      1. Follow I-95 North through Connecticut and Rhode Island to Providence, Rl.
      2. Follow instructions below from Providence.

      From Providence, RI

      1. Take I-95 North to Providence
      2. Take Exit 20 to Interstate 195 East Providence/Cape Cod.
      3. In Fall River, follow 195E New Bedford/Cape Cod.
      4. In Wareham take exit 22A/25 East – Cape Cod/The Islands
      5. Follow signs to Bourne Bridge – Falmouth/The Islands
      6. Take South 28 Falmouth/Martha’s Vineyard
      7. Follow sign for 28 South – Falmouth/Woods Hole

      From Boston, MA

      1. Take Southeast Expressway to MA 3
      2. Take US6 to Sagamore
      3. Follow US6 to Buzzards Bay, over Bourne Bridge
      4. Go south on 28 to Falmouth/Woods Hole

      To the Jonsson Center

      1. Entering Falmouth, follow signs toward Woods Hole
      2. At the second traffic signal on Woods Hole Road turn right on Quissett Harbor Road
      3. Proceed one block.
      4. Turn left on Quissett Avenue
      5. The Center entrance is located on the right, approximately 3/4 of a mile, and is identified by a large gray sign board.

      Parking

      Parking is free and space is usually plentiful. Participants are requested to park in the designated areas only and not on the lawn, driveways or in delivery entrances. Please observe all ONE WAY and NO PARKING signs.